Ms. Johnson's Class Page:

Kappa writers and readers - stop and observe what's around you, journey to other worlds-real or imagined, and keep using your talents to make this world a better place.


 


 


WEBSITES TO FIND BOOKS TO READ


This list has websites for book titles, ideas for books to read, and teens’ comments about books.



 Remember:  For any book title you hear or read about, just type the title into a search engine, e.g. Yahoo or Google to read a description of the storyline.



 




COPY AND PASTE THE WEB ADDRESSES TO CHECK OUT THE SITES:



 


http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa/booklistsawards/bestbooksya/bbyahome.cfm



Features: The American Library Association’s Young Adult Association’s book lists including award-winning books.  For challenging reading click on the left menu link to “Outstanding Books for the College Bound.”



 



 


http://www.readingrants.org



Features: Out of the ordinary, not necessarily best sellers, but some in depth, dramatic plots.



 




http://teenreads.com/features/ultimate-reading-list.asp



Features: Several different sections on the website including the ultimate reading list, teen reviews of books, book clubs, etc.




 


 


http://goodreads.com



Kappa login information   User ID: Katherine.johnson@sbschools.org     password: literature



 


 



http://search.ebscohost.com



EBSCO Host - Novelist Website   Login Info. – USERID: S9769288  PASSWORD: password


Once you have logged in, click on NovelistPlus.  Students can search for genres, non fiction, by reading level and/or topic.





http://www.yabookscentral.com



Features: High Interest Titles with links to read about each book



 




http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/professional-development/childlit/YoungAdult/index.html



Features: A Rutgers website with a Young Adult Literature section which includes menu links



to “Female Coming of Age Stories,” “Male Coming of Age Stories,” and a top 100 list.



 




http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa/yalsa.cfm
ON THE TOP OF THE LEFT HAND MENU, CLICK ON: YALSA's Booklists & Book Awards



SCROLL DOWN THE PAGE UNTIL YOU SEE, AND CLICK ON:



Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers



This is a comprehensive list for kids who struggle finding books they can get through and enjoy. 






http://www.teenink.com/reviews/book_reviews



Features: More than 700 teen-written book reviews collected by Teen Ink magazine.



 


 


 


CRITICAL THINKING GAMES AND ACTIVITIES


 


Higher level and more complex “serious” forms of brain exercises:


http://www.brainmetrix.com/



Fun and challenging critical thinking games:


http://www.freethinkinggames.com/free_critical_thinking_games.html



Easy, fun critical thinking games:


http://www.mathplayground.com/logicgames.html



Several links to critical thinking websites:


http://www.internet4classrooms.com/brain_teasers.htm


 


 


 


LITERARY DEVICES


Alliteration
The same sound starts a series of words or syllables.

Examples
---The cold, clammy hands grasped my neck.
---The bloody watchman told a tale of trouble and terror.
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Foreshadow
An author's use of hints or clues to suggest events that will occur later in the story. Not all foreshadowing is obvious. Frequently, future events are merely hinted at through dialogue, description, or the attitudes and reactions of the characters.

---Foreshadowing usually serves two purposes. It builds suspense by raising questions that encourage the reader to go and find out more about the event that is being foreshadowed. Foreshadowing is also a means of making a narrative more believable by partially preparing the reader for events which are to follow.
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Hyperbole
An exaggerated statement used for effect and not meant to be taken literally.

Examples
---Waves high as mountains broke over the reef.
---I had to wait an eternity for the file to download.
---------------------------------
Irony
The perceived notion of an incongruity, or a gap between an understanding of reality, or expectation of a reality, and what actually happens.

Examples
---A woman is planning her wedding and wants to get married on a beautiful, sunny day. She lives in Seattle, Washington where it often rains. She decides to have her wedding in Arizona, because it is usually sunny and dry. On the day of the wedding, not only does it rain in Arizona but it is dry and sunny in Seattle.
---Spoken Irony: The smashed hulk of metal, twisted and shaped into awkward, unlikely angles, lay on its side; one rear wheel spun slowly. Ruefully, the man said to his companion, "I'll bet I finally got rid of that squeak in the dashboard."
---------------------------------
Metaphor
A comparison in which one thing is said to be another.

Examples
---The cat's eyes were jewels, gleaming out of the darkness.
---The window was etched with frost.
---His fear was a prison, stronger than any more visible barricade.
---------------------------------

Onomatopoeia
The sound of the word imitates the original sound.

Examples
---The burning wood crackled and hissed; now and again an owl hooted somewhere in the darkness.
---The car creaked forward once the old engine began to wheeze reluctantly.
---------------------------------
Oxymoron
An intentionally non-parallel structure; frequently contains incongruous or contradictory terms.

Examples
---He tried to act naturally, but in these plastic glasses and designer jeans, he looked seriously funny.
---She went to the restaurant where they offered a weekly special on fresh frozen, jumbo shrimp.
---------------------------------
Parallel Construction
Grammatically identical or similar construction.

Examples
-Some cried, some wept, some remained hushed, but all felt the loss.
-Without enough men, without enough food, still the army was poised, ready to mount the attack.
---------------------------------
Personification
Representing abstract ideas as persons, endowing them with human attributes.

Examples
---Time stood still.
---Love enfolded us in her arms.
---------------------------------
Sarcasm
The act of making fun of a person to hurt her or his feelings; harsh or bitter irony.
A sneering or cutting remark; ironical taunt.

Examples
---"How unselfish you are!" said the girl as her brother took the biggest piece of cake.
---Mark Twain once said that the coldest winter he ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.
---------------------------------
Simile
A comparison in which two things are said to be like or as another.

Examples
---Like a writhing snake, the broken electrical wires hissed and twitched in the damp grass.
---As the gates opened, the mob surged forward like a burst dam.
---------------------------------
Understatement
Stating an idea in words that are less strong than anticipated.

Examples
---As steam poured out of Sean's ears Tanya said, "Careful, you may find that chili a bit hot."
---"It does seem a bit damp in here," said Mark as the water soaked through his shoes.
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